How to approve your remote learning policy

Your school isn't legally required to provide remote learning, but it's good practice to do so if your school can't open safely, or if pupils are able to learn but are unable to physically attend. Find out what to expect and questions to ask when approving the policy.

Last reviewed on 28 February 2023See updates
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Contents
  1. Key facts
  2. Your school isn't legally required to provide remote learning, but it should
  3. Main points to look out for
  4. Key questions to challenge the policy
  5. Model policy
  6. Examples from schools

Your school isn't legally required to provide remote learning, but it should

The old requirement that schools were legally bound to provide remote learning expired on 24 March 2022.

Since then, the Department for Education’s guidance on remote learning has been non-statutory.

Your school should only provide remote education to pupils where: 

  • Your school is closed or there are restrictions on who can attend, such as when:
    • Your school can't open safely
    • Opening would contradict government guidance
  • Individual pupils can't physically attend school but can continue learning
    • This might apply to pupils with an infectious illness or who are recovering from an operation or injury

Remote education is a last resort

Your school leaders shouldn't view remote education as an equal alternative to attendance in school.

If your school

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